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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)
higher than irene in new york harbor. >> wow. >> irene didn't make flooding. but if you take irene and add four more feet to the top of that surge, you're well over battery park. you're well up above the seawalls on both the east river and the hudson. then you think about the other side. you think about hoboken, you could get water 12 feet higher than normal. what would that do to the property? what would that do to rthe refineries over there. >> it's been hugging the east coast for a while. are we talking about the del marvo area, is it east of that, or is that the quandary here. >> that's the $60 million question. we know this storm is still going straight. it is not forecast to continue straight. it will turn west and hit the u.s. if it turns quickly it will hit the del marvo and truly affect washington, d.c. with a significant bigger punch than is forecast now. >> with hardly any drainage. >> you push that water up to chesapeake and all of a sudden you have a significant basin that will take water and it will go up quickly. that's not the forecast. if it goes up north, it takes
advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
irene. it was a tropical storm, warm and it was just water. we may get the wind here. we may get some property damage and people here are bracing for some power outages. so that's about it for now. we're fortunate. for irene we actually had a tornado, haven't had anything like that in terms of property damage. lots of flooding that we've shown you. you showed the viewers footage from dewey beach, lots of that type flooding throughout the area because of all the water in coastal delaware, over 50,000 people ordered out, evacuations. it's a lot more than that now because a lot of people have left on their own. >> we'd like to see bruce a bit closer in. >> someone was giving him grief for being in a shelter earlier. we won't do that ever again. we also saw pictures out of atlantic city where the storm actually went ashore. you have entire sections of the boardwalk atlantic city washed out to the ocean, haven't seen anything like that. >> it's a powerful storm. we always tell crews in the field on days like this safety is their top priority. here's why. cbs' chip reid is in ocean city cov
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
's lay them out. we start with the storm surge. in irene at battery park which is where i am tonight, we had three to six feet. we're expecting four to eight feet with this storm here and down the jersey shore as well. that will be higher than what they dealt with during irene. so plan on similar scenarios there. then look at the rainfall. huge areas of two inches plus, four inches plus. locally ten inches in spots in parts of new jersey and the chesapeake bay. if you remember the state of new jersey was one of those heavily fladed flooded back here with irene. then snowfall. to add insult to injury, west virginia, ohio, maryland, pennsylvania and parts of virginia could get 50 inches of snow with this. add all these ingredients together, that means power outages, some which will last for weeks. pennsylvania, new york, west virginia, an 800-mile-wide damage path with this. on the 108th anniversary of the opening of the subway system in new york, we're hoping that in 48 hours parts of it won't be under water. >> places are holding their breath tonight. jim cantore in lower manhattan for u
saw this last year in new york state, for example, when we got the one-two punch of hurricane irene and then the tropical storm lee. so there was quite an uptick in that sort of business. >> ted, thanks. we may catch up again to see how things have hopefully changed. >>> stick around. after the break, we'll find out how the storm could impact the election. the president is getting set to tour new jersey. stay with us for that. >>> we'll leave you with a look at how the futures are trading. the markets are reopening today on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." >> here are the headlines today. >> super storm sandy leaves a massive path of devastation in its wake, and residents up and down the u.s. east coast are now starting what could be a long and costly recovery process. >> but it is back to business for the financial markets in the u.s., they're going to reopen after a few days. it may not be so easy as new york's mass transit system is still snarled. >>> plus, the force. disney has agreed to buy lucas films for $4 billion and promises a brand-new "star wars" fi
, for irene they were 7, but irene was closer to 20, i think they will be as bad. but now, look at all stores that are closed, flights that have not gone out, hotels and businesses onshore and new york city that are down for 4 days, that is a loss of income. that is 20 billion that gets me to 40. gerri: wow, okay that makes sense. people underestimate the costs. i read new york city alone is an economy with $4 billion that pumps out $ 4 billion every day, times 5 is $20 billion, not just damage you repair. it is also the loss of productivity, workdays, loss payroll, it could be far more devastating than we've been talking babout, you also said, in short term painful but longer term we get a bunch of federal dollars that will pump energy into the economy. >> absolutely, if we have $20 billion in property damage we spend more than that rebuilding, we always do, on the shore property so valuable, they will build bigger homes and businesses. obsolete capital will be replaced by modern capital. we'd get multiplier effect, you spend a dollar on infrastructure, you get a dollar 80 in gdp from additi
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
as the rainfall forecast on the north side, there's not a lot. don't ft. big flooding like we had with irene but once you get to the south side that's the heavy amount so, again, veroni a veronica, sandy has intensified expect to get up to 90-mile-per-hour winds right before landfill this afternoon. we didn't want a stronger storm and it looks like we could be dealing with that shortly. >> what are you talking about, are you saying category 2, 3? >> it doesn't look like it will get to a category 2 and making that hybrid transition anyway so they probably won't go up to a category 2 but the fact the stronger the winds the more water this storm can push and that high tide cycle this morning and a couple of hours will be bad but the one tonight, that's the one that could be historic. >> bill, we'll check back with you. >>> much of southern new york will feel the biggest impact from this storm. right now we go to reporter tracy strahan of wnbc in rock way beach, this morning. tracy, what is it looking like right now? >> reporter: like these waves will quickly be approaches the boardwalk where we
quickly to change positions. already we've had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we're being told that protectively they'll shut off power down here soon so we hope everybody has gotten somewhere safe. sandy is coming. the question is, how will new york city handle it? the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town. wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 1800s in a place where you have to look up to see where many live, skyscrapers are a concern. wind speeds on the ground are half those on the top floors. sometimes forcing buildings to sway. >> the further up you live the more reason you should close your drapes and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watch this bath water slosh in a brookline high-rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an hour. half what's expected from sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teals have worked for days to disassembly a mashed down piece of machinery. fears heightened by that ten-ton steel arm dangling from a
positions. we have had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we are being told that p rotectively, they're going to shut off power downhill since so have everybody has gotten somewhere safe and sandy is coming the question i s, how will new york city handle it? >> the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town at wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 18 hundreds. and place we have to look up to see were many people live, spiked scrapers are a concern and wind speeds on the ground or half of those of those on the top floors sometimes forcing buildings to s way. >> the further up you live, the re reason you should close your dreams and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watched the bath water sloshing a brooklyn high- rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an h our, half of what is expected by sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teams worked at two get machinery tied down and fears heightened by 10-ton steel arm dangling from a high-rise bui
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
of the restaurant here. he was telling us that basically it was highest he had ever seen. he was here for irene last year. he has been with the restaurant for about a decade here at battery gardens. saying again it was the most water he had ever seen come up. he seas if it gets to be the 11-foot level, melissa, that will be trouble. he will predicts that will go above the two levels of terrace he has and begin to seep into his restaurant there. back to you. melissa: wow, robert gray, down at battery, normally one of the most beautiful places in manhattan at the very southern tip. thanks so much for that report. >>> the storm expected to hit an area responsible for 6.5% of the country's refining capacity. does that mean gas prices are about a spike? stock exchanges shuttered today and tomorrow. what will happen when trading starts again? price futures group senior market analyst phil flynn has been following all the stories for us. i want to ask you, philings because you're at cme. s&p futures will open about an hour from now. investor sentiment pent up because markets closed today and tomorrow. what
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the coast and heads for long island and we get flooding alon
and irene many did not see the extent of the damage coming. adam shapiro is doing looking for us. it will be flooding. that is what noaa is most concerned about. at 3:00 p.m. update they talked about the full moon and full moon cycles will create higher storm surge. what they can't say what part of the east coast will face the worst part of that storm surge. right now they are saying there is 90% certainty that the storm is doing, hurricane sandy right now, by the time it hits the united states or tropical storm or cyclone sandy, 90% certainty it will hit the united states monday night. once it hits and rain and rain and rain. according to noaa it will be a two or three day event tore most people, bringing in west virginia up to two feet of snow because it will impact with the other storm systemming coming out of the west. it is a cold front, when the cold front hits, snow in west virginia, snow in pennsylvania, snow in ohio. up to eight inches in pennsylvania and ohio. analysis from noaa, says roughly 10 inches of rain. hurricane irene dumped a lot of water on new jersey, vermon
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
seen it. worse than irene. this is a frustrating situation to him. it has all to do with underground infrastructure. i shouldn't say only because that would be a record breaking storm surge. we had one that was higher than that. that's the main reason that it will take so long. >> some of those areas deliberately shut down power out of precaution. explain what happened. >> it is convenient because you don't have wires aboveground. but during a flooding situation that can spell big problems and it did. so they will shut down some of the stations as a precautionary measure and saeal them off so they don't get the corrosive salt water in there. they judged it on the past historic storms and built it higher than that. that's exactly what sandy brought them. so an unprecedented event and something that really they didn't plan for. i asked them are you going to look into upgrading that? that would cost serious dollars but he did acknowledge, that's a question that certainly has to be discussed. >> i know you have spoken with a lot of new yorkers. how are they reacting? especially the lower
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
deep. that water has now come up, and we're well above the levels that we were during hurricane irene. that was expected as the storm surge now comes in, and as i said the wind picks up, and it's going to get worse as the -- as the evening goes on. all of the bridges now in and out of manhattan closed. the east river and the hudson river as well as the verazzano bridge that connects brooklyn and staten island. manhattan literally is now an island. there is also now the concern that conedison the local utility has raise that had they may have to do preemptive power outages, if it looks like some of the low-lying areas are going to flood to protect the underground equipment. they would do power outages, so so much for the utility of having utilities and elect call wires under a ground. that can be an issue as well when storm surges rise. we'll be back with more as our special coverage goes on. guys, back to you. >> thank you so much, scott. that's why we have so many issues with the exchange. that's the neighborhood where the new york stock exchange is. back to the dramatic picture in m
. a lot of people said they were not going to ride it out like they did irene. it's hard to say. you can see some of the windows in some of these high rises where there is power to them, generator power or what have you, but obviously it's very dark down here in lower manhattan with the power that's been shut off on purpose in many areas and that's the con edison said that they are doing that so they can easily -- more easily restore power once this storm goes through. but they've got a lot on their hands tonight, as we mentioned, with that explosion on one of the transformers on the other side. >> ida single, thank you so much. if we can go back to that video that we were just looking at, for people that have not seen the coverage throughout the evening, this is a picture of a crane atop a luxury high rise in midtown manhattan. it has been dangling precariously, dangerously off the top of that building which has become known in manhattan as the global billionaire's club because the nine full floors at the top have been sold to billionaires. two of the dupe pleks are $90 million each. yo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)